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dc.contributor.authorAliaga-Samanez, Alisa
dc.contributor.authorReal-Giménez, Raimundo 
dc.contributor.authorSegura, Marina
dc.contributor.authorMarfil-Daza, Carlos
dc.contributor.authorOlivero-Anarte, Jesús 
dc.date.accessioned2024-01-23T07:27:39Z
dc.date.available2024-01-23T07:27:39Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationAliaga-Samanez A, Real R, Segura M, Marfil-Daza C, Olivero J (2022) Yellow fever surveillance suggests zoonotic and anthroponotic emergent potential. Communications Biology 5:530es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10630/28998
dc.descriptionCopyright de los autoreses_ES
dc.description.abstractYellow fever is transmitted by mosquitoes among human and non-human primates. In the last decades, infections are occurring in areas that had been free from yellow fever for decades, probably as a consequence of the rapid spread of mosquito vectors, and of the virus evolutionary dynamic in which non-human primates are involved. This research is a pathogeographic assessment of where enzootic cycles, based on primate assemblages, could be amplifying the risk of yellow fever infections, in the context of spatial changes shown by the disease since the late 20th century. In South America, the most relevant spread of disease cases affects parts of the Amazon basin and a wide area of southern Brazil, where forest fragmentation could be activating enzootic cycles next to urban areas. In Africa, yellow fever transmission is apparently spreading from the west of the continent, and primates could be contributing to this in savannas around rainforests. Our results are useful for identifying new areas that should be prioritised for vaccination, and suggest the need of deep yellow fever surveillance in primates of South America and Africa.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by the Project CGL2016-76747-R, of the Spanish Ministry of Economy, Industry and Competitiveness and the European Regional Development Fund, and by the Project B4-2021-14 (08.37.00.20.27) of the Research Plan of the University of Malaga. AA-S was supported by the FPU16/06710 grant of the Spanish Ministry of Education.es_ES
dc.language.isospaes_ES
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectZoonosises_ES
dc.subject.otherPatogeografíaes_ES
dc.subject.otherBiogeografíaes_ES
dc.subject.otherEnfermedades zoonóticases_ES
dc.subject.otherOne healthes_ES
dc.titleYellow fever surveillance suggests zoonotic and anthroponotic emergent potentiales_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.centroFacultad de Cienciases_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s42003-022-03492-9
dc.rights.ccAttribution 4.0 Internacional*
dc.type.hasVersioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersiones_ES


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